Dr. Alex S. Wilner is an Assistant Professor of International Relations at the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs (NPSIA), Carleton University. He teaches classes on Intelligence, International Affairs, and Strategic Foresight.  Professor Wilner’s research primarily focuses on the application of deterrence theory to contemporary security issues, like terrorism, violent radicalization, organized crime, cyber threats, and proliferation. His books include Deterring Rational Fanatics(University of Pennsylvania Press, 2015), and Deterring Terrorism: Theory and Practice (eds., Stanford University Press, 2012), and he has published articles in International Security, NYU Journal of International Law and Politics, Security Studies, Journal of Strategic Studies, Comparative Strategy, and Studies in Conflict and Terrorism. His commentaries have appeared in the Globe and Mail, National Post, Ottawa Citizen, Embassy, Vanguard, and BBC News. Prior to joining NPSIA, Professor Wilner held a variety of positions at Policy Horizons Canada – the Government of Canada’s strategic foresight lab – the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto, the National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START) at the University of Maryland, and the ETH Zurich in Switzerland.

Alex Wilner's work for MLI


From Rehabilitation to Recruitment, by Alex Wilner, October 18, 2010


Why a Modi win in India will become a headache for Canada, in the Globe and Mail, April 14, 2014

The challenge of counterterrorism, in the Ottawa Citizen, Feb. 2, 2014

Ballistic missile defence – an idea whose time has come, in Frontline Magazine (with Brian Lee Crowley), Nov. 19, 2013

France's Africa links may have spared allies, in Embassy, Feb. 20, 2013

Bulgarian bomb report in hand, EU must now cripple Hezbollah, in the Globe and Mail, Feb. 6, 2013

Deterrence through disclosure, in Embassy, Feb. 10, 2012

Canada's mission to Libya – the sequel, in Embassy, Dec. 1, 2011

Getting ahead of prison radicalization, in the Globe and Mail, Oct. 18, 2010