02 May, 2017
7:00 PM
Canadian War Museum, 1 Vimy Pl, Ottawa, ON Buy tickets now

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Is our broken health care system infringing the rights of Canadians?

Ujjal Dosanjh and Dr. Brian Day will debate that question as part of another Great Canadian Debate, taking place May 2, 2017 at the Canadian War Museum in Ottawa.

Canadians have long taken great pride in medicare. But with rising costs, long wait lists and middling outcomes, some say the system is failing them. It has been argued in court and in public that denying timely treatment violates our Charter rights. Others will tell you the system works well, the alternatives are worse, and the principle of universal public coverage is vital for equality. Who is right? Is our broken heath care system violating the rights of Canadians?

Dr. Brian Day, an orthopedic surgeon and former president of the Canadian Medical Association, will argue in favour of the resolution “Our broken health care system is infringing the rights of Canadians”. Ujjal Dosanjh, a former British Columbia premier and federal minister of health, will argue against.

  • When: May 2, 2017
  • Where: Barney Danson Theatre, Canadian War Museum, 1 Vimy Pl., Ottawa, ON

Buy your tickets in advance and save! To buy your tickets, click here.

For more information on the Great Canadian Debates, click here.

A ticket to the Debates also earns you entrance into Vimy - Beyond the Battle, the Canadian War Museum's special exhibit dedicated to one of World War One's most costly battles. The Museum has also upgraded its existing section exploring the battle, which led to the loss and injury of over 10,200 Canadians between April 9 and 12, 1917.

The Vimy - Beyond the Battle exhibit will remain open after the debate is finished.

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Brian Day is a British Columbia-based orthopedic surgeon. He is founder and president of Cambie Surgeries Corporation, which over 20 years ago opened the first private hospital of its type in Canada. In 2009, together with 6 patient plaintiffs, 2 of whom have died while awaiting the trial date, Cambie mounted a constitutional challenge against prohibitions on patients’ access to care. He is a former president of the Canadian Medical Association.

Ujjal Dosanjh is one of Canada’s most successful politicians, serving as Premier of British Columbia, and more recently, as a member of Parliament and Health Minister in the Martin government, where he worked to prevent the provinces from privatizing the public health care system.